KYNO
Lesspain Software this week announced the beta version of KYNO, a brand new post-production workflow tool with a ton of useful functionality.

For most people, KYNO would be the preliminary step for their footage, bridging the gap between camera and NLE. As such, you can bring all of your footage into the software, view it in a number of useful ways, batch label it, add metadata, and of course transcode it to various edit-friendly formats. There are quite a few other features integrated into the software, but basically it’s an all-in-one tool for getting you organized and ready to edit.

Here’s a quick overview of KYNO’s main features:

Screen Shot 2016-04-30 at 3.32.56 PM

Here’s a video from the developers which show many of these features in action:

And here’s a crash course tutorial in navigating and using KYNO’s interface:

Though KYNO looks like it will be a handy solution for some folks, it does have some drawbacks, at least in its current beta state. Right now, it doesn’t have any RAW functionality built into it whatsoever, which means that folks looking for a workflow companion for their RAW footage will have to look elsewhere. Also, unlike its main competitor (Adobe Prelude), KYNO doesn’t seem to offer the ability to create rough cuts before shipping everything off to your NLE.

That said, I can see KYNO being a good solution for folks who deal with large amounts of non-RAW footage on a regular basis, and who edit in FCPX. I say that because I can’t really find a reason why this software would be preferable to Prelude considering it’s already included in the Creative Cloud subscription and is more tightly integrated with Premiere than this will likely ever be. But for FCPX editors who want to get things nice and organized before bringing footage in, this might be a great solution.

KYNO is free to try at the moment, so if your current post workflow tools have left you wanting something else, it couldn’t hurt to give it a shot. Once it’s up for sale later this year, early adopters will be able to get it for $99. And that price will jump to $159 in 2017.

I should also add that it’s nice to see a new software tool that is (or will be) available to buy outright. So many companies these days are opting for subscription models for their software. While it’s understandable why companies do this (stable revenue is pretty stellar and allows for more consistent development of the product), most of the solo operators and small production companies I know prefer to own the software outright and pay for updates down the line when it makes sense.

Anyhow, if you’re interested in downloading the beta, you can do so right here on Lesspain’s site.

[via Cinema5D]